h1

Who cares if you make a few mistakes? 言葉を間違えながら話しましょう!

2014.08.01 (Fri)

 

国の人口の英語話者の割合

国の人口の英語話者の割合。クリックしたら拡大。 Click to enlarge.

I’m sure you were told when you’ve been learning English that you need to use the ‘correct’ grammar and pronunciation. But language is a fluid, organic thing that doesn’t really have strict rules. There are lots of English words where the pronunciation and the spelling aren’t consistent, and many examples of grammar exceptions.

If you take a look at the history of English, the reason for this becomes clear. Very briefly, the West German dialect of the Germanic tribes who conquered England in the 5th century became the foundation of modern English. In the 12th century, the Norman conquest brought many French words into the language, and then from the 15th to the 17th centuries, the Great Vowel Shift led to a change in pronunciation after spelling was largely set, which is why the spelling and pronunciation of some words is so different in modern English. And all the time the English language was taking in words from Latin and Greek, as well as Scandinavian and other Western European languages, creating a very mixed language. In the 16th century, the English of that time went with emigrants to America, Canada and the West Indies, and through the 19th century colonial period, the English of that time went to India, South Africa, Hong Kong, Australia and other places. In each place, it mixed with the local languages and developed into stand-alone regional dialects.

Modern English, which is based on that convoluted history, is spoken by 430 million native speakers around the world, and as a second language by nearly three times that number of people. So given all of that, I want Japanese people to know that there is no such thing as ‘standard English’, and so you don’t need to worry if you are speaking ‘correct’ English. Of course, you need to know something about grammar and pronunciation to get your meaning across, but it’s better to focus on whether you are communicating with the other person rather than whether your English is ‘correct’. If you don’t stress too much, and just have a go at speaking, you can generally get your meaning across. Even if your grammar or your pronunciation is a bit different!

On another note, I’ll be finishing my contract with Yurihama and returning to Australia at the start of August. My time here has flown past, and thanks to the kind people of the town it has been a wonderful year. My husband Pete and I have really enjoyed living in Yurihama, and we’ve met so many different people and made many good memories. I want to express my deep gratitude to everyone. Over this year, I’ve heard a lot of American English and a lot of Tottori Japanese, and recently I was told by friends both back home and in Kanto that my English and my Japanese have become a bit different! Language really is a living thing.

It was only a short time, but I want to thank you everyone, and I look forward to seeing everyone again.

正しい文法や発音を覚えましょうと、英語を学ぶときに言われたことがあると思いますが、私は言語ほど流動的で、有機的で、そしてはっきりとした規則があるものではないと思っています。例えば、英単語ひとつをとっても、発音とつづりが一致していないものや、文法にも例外がたくさんあります。

これは英語の歴史を学べば分かると思います。5世紀にゲルマン系民族がブリテン島を占拠したとき、当時の西ドイツ語の方言が英語の基になっていると言われています。12世紀にはノルマン征服によりフランス語が大量に導入され、15~17世紀にかけて起こった大母音推移(長母音の変化)により、今の発音になったようです(だから、つづりと発音が異なる単語が多いのです)。これと同時にラテン語やギリシャ語をはじめ、スカンジナビアや西ヨーロッパの国々の言葉なども入り込み、非常に複雑に進化した混交語になりました。また、16世紀に入ると、アメリカ、カナダ、西インド島などへ移民した者が当時の英語を持ち出したり、19世紀のイギリス植民地時代にもオーストラリア、香港、インドへもその当時の英語を持ち出したり、先住民の言語などの影響を受けたりと、それぞれの場所で独自の進化を歩んできたのです。

このような複雑な歴史をたどってきた現代英語ですが、英語を母国語としているのは世界中で4億3千万人、そして第2言語として話している人はその3倍もあるようです。つまり、現代英語には標準語がないので「正しい英語を使わなければならない」という心配をする必要はないことを、多くの日本人に知っていただきたいのです。もちろんある程度の文法や発音が必要ですが、それが正しいかどうかを心配するより、自分の言いたいことが相手に通じているかどうかを考えればよいのです。緊張せずに、とりあえず言ってみると、何とかなるものですよ。少しくらい文法や発音の違っても!

さて、私は8月にオーストラリアに帰国することになりました。本当にあっという間の1年間でしたが、夫のピートと生活を楽しむことができましたし、たくさんの親切な皆さんと出会えたので、とても素敵な時間を過ごすことができました。深く、深く感謝しています。この1年間でたくさんアメリカ英語や鳥取弁が耳に入ったので、この前ブリスベンや関東の友達に、英語にも日本語にも少しなまりができたと言われました。本当に言語は生き物だなと思います。

短い間でしたが、本当にありがとうございました。また、皆さんとお会いできたらいいですね。

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: