h1

Valentine’s Day and the evolution of culture バレンタインデーと文化の進化

2014.02.07 (Fri)
valentine

JD Hancock via Flickr Creative Commons

February means Valentine’s Day. In Japan, it’s become normal for women to give chocolates to men on Valentine’s Day. Years ago in Australian, it was probably mostly thought of as a religious day, and there was no set way to celebrate it. But lately, more people don’t know about the link to religion and, like Japan, celebrate the day of “love” in whatever way they want. Although, because we don’t have “White Day” (in Japan, 14 March, where men give chocolates to women), on Valentine’s Day it is normal to give cards, chocolates or flowers to friends of any gender as well as romantic partners.

I have written about this sort of thing before, but this is one of the really interesting things about working in international relations – learning about how the differences between how countries and cultures take on and change things like Valentine’s Day.

Apparently, in Roman times, Valentine’s Day was the day before the festival to ask the gods for a bountiful harvest, and was a holy day for Juno, the queen of the gods and of family and weddings. Before that, it’s thought to have been a pagan celebration of the start of Spring. After the spread of Christianity, it became the commemoration day for St Valentinus (these days, St Valentine), a Christian martyr who was put to death for secretly performing marriage ceremonies for Roman soldiers, who were not allowed to marry at the time. So, because the champion of love, St Valentinus, was put to death on 14 February, it became his day.

The way Valentine’s Day is celebrated in Australia is changing, and, similar to how Halloween is becoming more popular, it may continue to change. In Japan as well, we are starting to see things like ‘friend chocolate’, ‘reverse chocolate’ and ‘self chocolate’, so the odds are that it will keep changing here as well. Another example is in Korea, where Japan’s idea of White Day was adopted, “Black Day” has  also been invented. Black Day is a day when single people get together to wear black, eat black food and celebrate (or commiserate) being single.

Finally, a piece of advice for those of you who are anxious about this year’s Valentine’s Day. If you consider the whole of human history, the current way that we celebrate Valentine’s Day is only a tiny blip. So how about inventing a way to celebrate it that suits you?

2月といえば、バレンタインデーですよね。日本では、女性が男性にチョコレートをあげることが普通ですが、30年前のオーストラリアでは、キリスト教的な祝日と思われていたので、一般的な祝い方がありませんでした。現在は、キリスト教との関係を知らないで、日本と同じように自分なりに「愛」を祝っている人が多いかもしれません。ただ、ホワイトデーがないため、バレンタインデーは性別とは関係なく、好きな人や友達などにバレンタインカード、花、チョコレートなどをあげたりします。

以前にも書きましたが、バレンタインデーのような文化でも国によって違いがあり、彼らがどのように受け入れ、変えてきたのかなどを学べることは、国際交流の仕事で大変興味深いことの1つです。

バレンタインデーはローマ帝国時代の豊年を祈願する祭りの前日で、家族と結婚の神であり神々の女王であるユノの祝日だったそうです。もっとさかのぼると、ユノの祝日も元々異教の春祭りだったと考えられています。キリスト教が普及した後は、聖ウァレンティヌス(キリスト教の殉教者でローマ帝国の時代、兵士の禁じられていた結婚式を秘密裏に行ったため処刑された。現代は「バレンタイン」と呼ばれている。)の記念日として知られるようになりました。つまり、愛の英雄の聖ウァレンティヌスが2月14日に処刑されたので、愛を祝うバレンタインデーになったとされています。

オーストラリアのバレンタインデーの形は変わり続けていて、これからハロウインのように普及していくのかもしれませんし、祝い方が変わっていくのかもしれません。日本でも「友チョコ」、「逆チョコ」と「自己チョコ」などが最近普及しているので、これから変わっていくかもしれませんね。韓国でも、日本のホワイトデーを導入してから、日本にはない4月14日の「ブラックデー」という習慣を作り出しました。「ブラックデー」とは、恋人がいない人たちが、黒い服を着たり黒い食べ物を食べたり、独りであることを一緒に慰めようとするものです。

最後に、今年のバレンタインデーで悩んでいるあなたへアドバイス。人間の長い歴史上、バレンタインデーが現在の形になって間がないのですから、自分なりの祝い方を作ってみて、自分なりの意味をもたせても良いのではありませんか。

Advertisements

2 comments

  1. A very nice way to wrap up this entry. I’m not in department stores every often, but I do love oogling at all the decorative chocolates around this time of year. I think it’s starting to become a day to celebrate my sweet tooth instead of love. XD


    • Thanks! I know, I like the idea of making chocolates and packaging them up much more than I like the idea of actually giving them to people, if that makes sense. So much pretty stuff!



Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: