h1

Queensland’s summer of disasters クイーンズランドの「災害の夏」

2014.01.09 (Thu)

800px-Barnoona_Road_in_the_Brisbane_suburb_of_PaddingtonPhoto by Rae Allen (Flickr: IMGP6016_rosalie) [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Brisbane is a city of 2.2 million people, with the large, lazy Brisbane River running through the city centre. It has a similar climate to Okinawa, and it’s a slightly humid, relaxed kind of town.

However, the spring rains that started in October 2010 kept going until the following January, and combined with a cyclone hitting the north of the state, some 75% of Queensland (about 3.5 times the entire area of Japan) flooded and 38 people lost their lives. This is known as “the Summer of Natural Disasters” in Queensland. It will be the third anniversary of that summer in January.

There had already been an ongoing natural disaster in Queensland for the ten years before the floods, with 60% of the state under record-breaking drought. It seemed no sooner than the drought declaration was lifted, the floods began. Even though natural disasters are pretty common in Australia, to go from record-breaking drought to record-breaking rain made a lot of people joke, “We must have annoyed the bloke upstairs!”

On 10 January 2011, the event that came to be called the “Inland Tidal Wave” happened. Following weeks of drenching rains and sodden soil, the rain that fell on that day at the rate of 160mm an hour turned directly into runoff, and became a flash flood. After slamming into the town of Toowoomba at the top of the Great Dividing Range, the wall of water rushed down the range to swallow up the towns in the Lockyer Valley below. In a hellish event, cars and buildings were washed away, and 23 people died.

The following day, the water began to rise in Brisbane city, and some 20,000 houses were flooded across the area. Over the two days that the floodwaters peaked and receded, we were asked to stay in our houses unless evacuating. All we could do was sit and wait and listen to the radio.

Australian culture, based on ideas of egalitarianism, includes the concept of ‘mateship’. It means that you treat everyone the same, and you help people who need help. This idea of mateship could be seen in the “Mud Army”. As the flood warnings were lifted, people began appearing from all over. Wearing gumboots, and carrying gloves and shovels, people worked together in the days after the floods to clear debris from damaged houses and gardens, streets and roads, parks and schools. Those who couldn’t do the physical clearing helped in other ways, such as making food and watching children. I got out there too, covered in mud, clearing away broken trees and bits of buildings. It was an amazing event, and it restored my faith in humanity.

So, with this three-year anniversary of that time, in remembering those people who lost their lives alongside the strength of the Mud Army, perhaps we can reflect on both the horror of natural disasters, as well as the strength and wonder of humanity.

私のふるさとであるクイーンズランド州都のブリスベン市は、街の中心をブリスベン川がゆったりと流れている人口220万人の大きな街です。気候は沖縄と似ていて、ちょっと湿気があってのんびりとした感じの街です。

しかし、2010年10月から始まった春の雨は翌年の1月上旬まで断続的に続き、さらに州の北方では台風が襲い、州の75%(日本面積の約3.5倍)が水浸しになって、38人もの死者が出ました。これが「災害の夏」と言われるオーストラリアの大災害で、今月で3年目を迎えます。

実は、クイーンズランド州ではこの大災害が起きる10年間ほど前から、記録的な干ばつに悩まされ、州の60%近い地域に干ばつ災害宣言が出されていました。その宣言が取り消された途端、この大雨が始まったのです。オーストラリアではよく災害が発生しますが、記録的な干ばつの直後に記録的な大雨にあったため「神様が怒っているのかなぁ」と、州民がよく言っていました。

また、2011年1月10日、ブリスベン市の近くの町で「内陸の波」と言われる災害も発生しました。何週間か降り続けた雨に加え、その日は1時間160ミリの猛烈な雨が降り、その雨は凄まじい鉄砲水に変化しました。その鉄砲水は文字通り鉄砲のようになり、グレートディヴァイディング山脈の峰にあるトゥーンバ町に激突した後、峰を越えて山腹の下にあるロッキャー谷の町や村を一瞬にして飲み込みました。車や建物も完全に洪水に流されしまい、23人が死亡し、地獄のような出来事でした。

ブリスベン市もその翌日から浸水し始め、2万軒もの家が被害にあいました。徐々に水が引き始めたのは2日経ってからで、それまでは避難する以外は外出が禁じられ、できることはずっとラジオを聞きながら待つことでした。

さて、平等主義に基づくオーストラリアの文化には「メイトシップ」という連帯感を示す言葉があります。どんな人にでも分け隔てなく接し、困っている人がいたら必ず助けてあげるという意味も含まれています。

その象徴の1つに「泥軍隊」があります。災害の警報が解除されると、あちらこちらから大勢の人が現れます。長靴を履き、熊手やシャベルを持って、数日間かけて被害にあわれた家や庭、街の道路や公園、学校など、力を合わせて残骸を処分しました。力仕事ができない人たちも、食品の調理や子守りなどでできる限り周囲の人々を支えました。私も泥だらけになりながら、臭い泥と砕けた植物や建物などを少しずつ片付けました。本当に感動的な出来事で、人間への信頼が取り戻せたと言っても過言ではありません。

今度の3周年記念日には、亡くなられた方や泥軍隊を思い出しながら、災害の恐ろしさと人間の素晴らしさを改めて感じることでしょう。

Advertisements

One comment

  1. The place has grown a little. Good story though. Just needs a tiny dot.



Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: